X-FUJINON
© 2012 - 2013 Baris S. Bille. All rights reserved.
Lenses  Cameras
How to use X-Fujinon lenses on a SONY NEX or Micro Four Thirds Camera

»It started very simply with a roll of film. At Fuji, we believed that to make the very best roll of film we could, we had to know exactly what was happening inside the camera. So we made cameras. And discovered that we couldn't really know what was happening inside the camera unless we made our own lenses. So we made lenses. In fact, we didn't just make lenses, we even went so far as to manufacture our own optical glass for our lenses. Now, in the entire world of 35mm photography, how many companies do all that? One. Fuji.« (Contemporary Fuji ad)

This is a list of Fujinon X-bayonet lenses, available new from 1980 until around 1990. The X mount was created for a line of Fujica SLR cameras: AX-1, AX3, AX-5, STX-1, STX-1N and STX-2. It replaced the M42 screw mount used on earlier Fuji SLRs.

Fuji launched the series with three compact, electronically controlled cameras (AX) and one base manual model (STX). »A« stood for exposure automation, »X« for X bayonet. The numeral (roughly) indicated the number of operating modes. Five in the top of the line model AX-5, down to one in the entry level AX-1. German retail chain PORST distributed Fujica cameras under their own brand labeled CR-1 (STX-1), CR-3 (AX-1), CR-5 (AX-3) and CR-7 (AX-5).

The lens lineup was extensive, ranging from 16mm fisheye up to 400mm telephoto. However, set to compete in a market that was almost saturated in the early 1980s, Fujis X system failed commercially and was abandoned after only a few years.

Today, Fuji X lenses represent a small selection of manual lenses left without a dedicated digital base, thus well suited to experimental use on mirrorless, digital cameras.



X-Fujinon lenses

Lens 
16mm f2.8
19mm f3.5
24mm f2.8
28mm f1.9
28mm f2.8
28mm f3.5
35mm f1.9
35mm f2.8
50mm f1.2
50mm f1.6
50mm f1.9
55mm f1.6
55mm f2.2
55mm f3.5
100mm f2.8
135mm f2.5
135mm f2.8
135mm f3.5
200mm f4.5
400mm f4.5
Type 
Fisheye
Superwide
Wide
Wide
Wide
Wide
Wide
Wide
Standard
Standard
Standard
Standard
Standard
Macro
Tele
Tele
Tele
Tele
Tele
Tele
Branding 
X-Fujinon
X-Fujinon
X-Fujinon
X-Fujinon
X-Fujinar / X-Kominar
X-Fujinon
X-Fujinon
X-Fujinon
X-Fujinon / Porst
X-Fujinon / Porst
X-Fujinon / Porst
X-Fujinon
X-Fujinon
X-Fujinon
X-Fujinon
X-Fujinon
X-Fujinar / X-Kominar
X-Fujinon
X-Fujinon
X-Fujinon
Coating 
EBC
EBC
EBC
EBC
-
EBC
EBC
EBC
EBC
EBC / -
-
EBC / -
-
EBC
EBC
EBC
-
EBC
EBC
EBC
Close Distance (m) 
0.2
0.25
0.25
0.3
0.35
0.3
0.35
0.35
0.45
0.6
0.6
0.45
0.6
0.24
1
1.5
1.5
1.5
2.5
8
Filter size (mm) 
-
72
49
55
49
49
49
49
55
49
49
49
49
49
49
58
55
49
49
49



16mm f2.8 EBC X-Fujinon (Fisheye DM)   top



This is a fat and heavy lens, over 7cm in barrel diameter. Build quality is exceptional, so was the price. There are UV, yellow, orange and blue filters included, each selectable with a twist of the dedicated filter ring. On APS-C the lens acts as a »semi-fisheye« at 24mm equivalent. Definition is high already at f2.8, stopping down mostly enhances depth of field.

Angle of view: 180°
Close distance: 0.2m
Smallest f-stop: f16
Filters: built-in
Hood: built-in
Optics: 12 elements in 8 groups
Weight: 408g
Street price: 338$ (Source: Cambridge Camera Exchange ad, 12/1989)



19mm f3.5 EBC X-Fujinon (SW DM)   top



Fujis widest rectilinear lens with a fairly large 72mm front diameter. The lens feels well crafted. At f3.5, good center resolution with slightly fuzzy periphery. Performance peaks two stops down at f8 where edge to edge sharpness (APS-C) is achieved. Typical achromatism towards the sides of the frame. Effective control of flare thanks to Fujis EBC coating, but the convex front and sophisticated 11 elements may catch a ghost or two in counter light. Optical construction seems identical to the older screw-mount version which is usually very well regarded among users.

Angle of view: 95.5°
Close distance: 0.25m
Smallest f-stop: f16
Filters: 72mm
Hood: screw-in
Optics: 11 elements in 8 groups
Weight: 265g
Street price: 200$ (Source: Cambridge Camera Exchange ad, 12/1989)



24mm f2.8 EBC X-Fujinon (SW DM)   top


Much smaller than the mighty 19/3.5 and light enough to fit in a vest pocket. Sadly, performance leaves something to be desired. There is a well defined center right from f2.8 but corners remain fuzzy, even stopped down. Out of focus rendition is nervous and overall rendition lacks the clarity of better designs. German Color Foto ran a comparison of 17 lenses at 24mm in 1/1986 and Fujis 24/2.8 ranked among the worst.

Angle of view: 84°
Close distance: 0.25m
Smallest f-stop: f16
Filters: 49mm
Hood: rectangular, clip-on
Optics: 9 elements in 8 groups
Weight: 195g
Street price: 149$ (Source: Cambridge Camera Exchange ad, 12/1989)



28mm f1.9 EBC X-Fujinon (SW DM)   top


This is an outstanding lens, unfortunately also very rare. At f1.9 transition from in to out of focus is beautifully smooth. Center resolution is already very high but aberrations keep contrast on the low side. One stop down aberrations are mostly gone. At f4 edge to edge sharpness (APS-C) and overall peak of definition. Ultimately, for flat field work, many slower lenses will resolve more detail in the far corners, but considering the typical application of a fast wide, the X-Fujinon 28/1.9 can't be beat.

Angle of view: 75°
Close distance: 0.3m
Smallest f-stop: f16
Filters: 55mm
Hood: screw-in
Optics: 8 elements in 8 groups
Weight: 280g
Street price: 178$ (Source: Cambridge Camera Exchange ad, 12/1989)



28mm f2.8 X-Fujinar (W DM)
built by Nittoh Kogaku K.K., also sold as X-Kominar



Despite Fujis marketing claims of being lighter and more compact, this budget Fujinar / Kominar 28mm beat the comparable X-Fujinon 28/3.5 in price and speed. The lens is well made and comes with a built-in shade. At f2.8 center definition is quite good but aberrations keep contrast low. Corners are softer. By f4 flare is mostly gone and good contrast sets in. At f8 perfect definition from edge to edge (APS-C) is achieved. Still great value as it is most often overlooked on the used market when searching for Fujinon, instead of Fujinar or even Kominar.

Angle of view: 76°
Close distance: 0.35m
Smallest f-stop: f16
Filters: 49mm
Hood: built-in
Optics: 6 elements in 6 groups
Weight: 195g
Street price: 60$ (Source: Photron ad, 06/1981)



28mm f3.5 EBC X-Fujinon (W DM)




Compact and lightweight, one of the more popular Fujinons at the time. Performance is excellent right from f3.5 with slight vignetting (APS-C) and a trace of achromatism; highly resistant to flare. Overall peak of contrast and resolution at f8 but perfectly usable at open aperture.

Angle of view: 74°
Close distance: 0.3m
Smallest f-stop: f16
Filters: 49mm
Hood: rectangular, clip-on
Optics: 5 elements in 5 groups
Weight: 160g
Street price: 84$ (Source: Cambridge Camera Exchange ad, 12/1989)



35mm f1.9 EBC X-Fujinon (W DM)   top



This fast reportage standard was carried forward from Fujis own M42 design, though the X is lighter, will focus a little closer and lacks the thoriated element. Optical performance between the two is similar. Troubled by flare around high contrast edges at open aperture, one stop down center performance takes a jump. Far borders remain worse due to curvature of field, especially close up and the missing close range correction (»floating element«) becomes apparent. Compared to the much larger, contemporary Nikkor 35/1.4 AIS center resolution is about equal, but the Nikkor does show a higher level of performance corner to corner. Bokeh can be equally busy on both designs. Personally, I prefer the rendition of the X at f1.9 over the Nikkor at f1.4. Stopped down results are hard to discern.

Compared to Leicas famed Summicron M 35/2 IV the Fujinon shows significantly less contrast at open aperture. Rendition of out of focus areas is somewhat similar except for the M lens to distort highlights towards to the sides of the frame. By f4 results are mostly similar with Leitz keeping the edge in contrast.

Sonys dedicated SEL 35/1.8 OSS shows very high contrast and central resolution on the NEX, starting right at f1.8 but corners suffer from severe vignetting. Out of focus zones are rendered either very smooth close up or merely »blurry«, depending on subject distance. There is no clear delineation of highlights as in the X-Fujinon or Summicron. Compared at f4 the Sony draws with almost clinical precision, the Fujinon follows with a little less contrast overall and some distortion towards the corners. Obviously, Sonys SEL 35/1.8 is a modern APS-C type, autofocus lens. As perfect as it may render on the NEX, the focusing ring feels almost undamped and the imaging circle wont cover the larger sensor area of any possible future mirrorless camera.

Angle of view: 63.5°
Close distance: 0.35m
Smallest f-stop: f16
Filters: 49mm
Hood: screw-in
Optics: 8 elements in 6 groups
Weight: 205g
Street price: -



35mm f2.8 EBC X-Fujinon (W DM)



Angle of view: 63°
Close distance: 0.35m
Smallest f-stop: f16
Filters: 49mm
Hood: screw-in
Optics: 7 elements in 6 groups
Weight: 190g
Street price: 89$ (Source: Cambridge Camera Exchange ad, 12/1989)



50mm f1.2 EBC X-Fujinon (DM)   top
50mm f1.2 PORST UMC







A great lens to work with selective depth-of-field and holds enough resolving power for general application. At f1.2 the focal plane is tiny and aberrations contribute to a low contrast, somewhat »dreamy« image with distinct bokeh. By f4 contrast and sharpness excel. Compared with the contemporary Canon FD 50/1.2 L the Fujinon already hints higher resolution at open aperture to visibly outclass the Canon lens stopped down. The FD L - being an aspheric design - keeps aberrations well under control at open aperture, otherwise clearly fails to resolve as much detail (APS-C). The X-Fujinon 50/1.2 is probably one of the true gems of the system. Build quality is superior to the slower standard lenses. Note that the Porst 50/1.2 UMC is in fact the same lens, except for the engravings on the front ring.

Angle of view: 45.3°
Close distance: 0.45m
Smallest f-stop: f16
Filters: 55mm
Hood: clip-on
Optics: 7 elements in 7 groups
Weight: 300g
Street price: 200$ (Source: Cambridge Camera Exchange ad, 12/1989)



50mm f1.6 EBC X-Fujinon (DM)
50mm f1.6 PORST UMC




At f1.6 slight vignetting but good definition over the image frame; typical aberrations are mostly gone one stop down at f2.8. By f4 excellent contrast and definition from edge to edge. Note that I have seen better and worse samples of the 50/1.6 so far. It may be well worth trying a second copy if you suspect your lens to show any imaging defects, especially corner performance at wide apertures.

Angle of view: 48°
Close distance: 0.6m
Smallest f-stop: f16
Filters: 49mm
Hood: screw-in
Optics: 6 elements in 6 groups
Weight: 170g
Street price: -



50mm f1.6 X-Fujinon (DM)
50mm f1.6 PORST



This plain 50/1.6 retailed substantially cheaper than the EBC variant, about 30$ in 1981 when bought with a camera (or 80$ in todays value). Optical construction between the two is identical, so is real world performance. As with the 55/1.6 I have not seen any advantage of EBC over Fujis regular multicoating, which may have a greater impact on film than digital.

Angle of view: 48°
Close distance: 0.6m
Smallest f-stop: f16
Filters: 49mm
Hood: screw-in
Optics: 6 elements in 6 groups
Weight: 170g
Street price: 47$ (Source: Adorama ad, 06/1985)



50mm f1.9 X-Fujinon (DM) / (FM)
50mm f1.9 PORST



Low contrast but high detail at f1.9; quite good overall at f2.8 with some softening towards the borders, gone by f8. Compared to the 50/1.6 EBC, the faster lens shows better corner performance and somewhat smoother rendition of bokeh. There are 5 aperture blades in the 50/1.9 opposed to 6 in the 50/1.6 resulting in slightly different highlight shapes.

Angle of view: 47°
Close distance: 0.6m
Smallest f-stop: f16
Filters: 49mm
Hood: screw-in
Optics: 5 elements in 5 groups
Weight: 150g
Street price: 34$ (Source: Adorama ad, 06/1985)



55mm f1.6 EBC X-Fujinon (DM)



One of the very first X lenses, available in EBC and non-EBC, although I have not seen any performance difference when compared side by side. At f1.6 low contrast and slight vignetting but good definition over the image frame. At f2.8 already excellent performance improving marginally until f8. Chromatic aberrations are well corrected, as is curvature of field. Compared to the younger 50/1.6, this one is larger and heavier but will focus closer (0.45m vs 0.6m). Bokeh and overall imaging characteristics are about similar. Personally I prefer the 55mm due to its broader focusing ring.

Compared to the Leica Summicron M 50/2 IV the Fujinon shows a little less contrast at open aperture. Out of focus highlights appear partly diffused, where the M lens draws clear circles. By f4 results are more or less smilar.

Sonys own SEL 50/1.8 OSS shows significantly higher contrast and resolution at open aperture. Stopped down results start to converge. By f4 both are hard to discern without comparing images side by side.

Angle of view: 42°
Close distance: 0.45m
Smallest f-stop: f16
Filters: 49mm
Hood: screw-in
Optics: 5 elements in 4 groups
Weight: 275g
Street price: -



55mm f2.2 X-Fujinon

Coupled with the entry level STX-1, this is the only non-DM (dial mode) lens below 400mm, meaning limited support of program modes with the AX-5. At f2.2 images are low in contrast and almost »soft filtered« hazy but resolution within the focal plane is good. At f4 high contrast kicks in. Peak performance at f8 where images are aberration free corner to corner. Being quite soft until f2.8 I do not consider this a great general purpose lens. Fujis decision to sell this as a »kit lens« to typical entry level buyers seems questionable in retrospect.

Angle of view: 42°
Close distance:0.6m
Smallest f-stop: f16
Filters: 49mm
Hood: screw-in
Optics: 4 elements in 4 groups
Weight: 130g
Street price: -



55mm f3.5 EBC X-Fujinon (Macro DM)

Angle of view: 43°
Close distance: 0.24m
Smallest f-stop: f22
Filters: 49mm
Hood: screw-in
Optics: 5 elements in 4 groups
Weight: 202g
Street price: 118$ (Source: Cambridge Camera Exchange ad, 12/1989)



100mm f2.8 EBC X-Fujinon (T DM)   top



A moderately fast tele lens for portrait and general application. Performance is excellent right from f2.8 and coupled with the focal length allows for strong subjection isolation. Basically flawless on APS-C and holds very well up to Leicas Summicron M 90/2.

Angle of view: 24°
Close distance: 1.0m
Smallest f-stop: f22
Filters: 49mm
Hood: screw-in
Optics: 5 elements in 4 groups
Weight: 245g
Street price: 84$ (Source: Cambridge Camera Exchange ad, 12/1989)



135mm f2.5 EBC X-Fujinon (T DM)   top



Angle of view: 18.2°
Close distance: 1.5m
Smallest f-stop: f22
Filters: 58mm
Hood: screw-in
Optics: 5 elements in 4 groups
Weight: 425g
Street price: 115$ (Source: Cambridge Camera Exchange ad, 12/1989)



135mm f2.8 X-Fujinar (T DM)
built by Nittoh Kogaku K.K., also sold as X-Kominar




Angle of view: 18°
Close distance: 1.5m
Smallest f-stop: f16
Filters: 55mm
Hood: built-in
Optics: 4 elements in 4 groups
Weight: 440g
Street price: 60$ (Source: Photron ad, 06/1981)



135mm f3.5 EBC X-Fujinon (T DM)



Angle of view: 18°
Close distance: 1.5m
Smallest f-stop: f22
Filters: 49mm
Hood: screw-in
Optics: 4 elements in 4 groups
Weight: 290g
Street price: 118$ (Source: Cambridge Camera Exchange ad, 12/1989)



200mm f4.5 EBC X-Fujinon (T DM)   top



A compact tele with fine performance from f4.5. Thanks to its modest aperture the lens takes standard 49mm filters and is small enough to fit most travel kits. Build quality is excellent with a broad rubberized focusing ring and an all-metal barrel down to the integrated hood. Outer dimensions match the 135/2.5 which is a good thing. Subject isolation is superb, so is »bokeh« from portrait distance.

Angle of view: 12°
Close distance: 2.5m
Smallest f-stop: f22
Filters: 49mm
Hood: built-in
Optics: 5 elements in 5 groups
Weight: 490g
Street price: 94$ (Source: Cambridge Camera Exchange ad, 12/1989)



400mm f4.5 EBC X-Fujinon (T)   top


Angle of view:
Close distance: 8m
Smallest f-stop: f45
Filters: 49mm
Hood: built-in
Optics: 5 elements in 4 groups
Weight: 1940g
Street price: 530$ (Source: Cambridge Camera Exchange ad, 12/1989)



29-47mm f3.5 - 4.2 X-Fujinon (Z DM)   top

Angle of view: 74° - 50°
Close distance: 0.6m
Smallest f-stop: f22
Filters: 55mm
Hood: clip-on
Optics: 8 elements in 8 groups
Weight: 285g



43-75mm f3.5 - 4.5 X-Fujinon (Z DM)   top

Angle of view: 54° - 32°
Close distance: 1.2m
Smallest f-stop: f22
Filters: 49mm
Hood: -
Optics: 7 elements in 7 groups
Weight: 310g



35-70mm f2.8 - 3.7 Macro X-Fujinon (Z DM)   top

Angle of view: 62° - 35°
Close distance: 1m (+ macro setting)
Smallest f-stop: f22
Filters: 62mm
Hood: -
Optics: 7 elements in 7 groups
Weight: 435g



70-140mm f4 - 4.5 X-Fujinon (Z DM)   top

Angle of view: 33° - 19°
Close distance: 1.5m
Smallest f-stop: f22
Filters: 55mm
Hood: screw-in
Optics: 10 elements in 9 groups
Weight: 565g



85-225mm f4.5 X-Fujinon (Z DM)   top

Angle of view: 11° - 29°
Close distance: 1.6m
Smallest f-stop: f22
Filters: 55mm
Hood: screw-in
Optics: 12 elements in 9 groups
Weight: 720g



80-200mm f3.8 X-Fujinar (Z DM)   top

Angle of view: 12° - 31°
Close distance: 2m
Smallest f-stop: f16
Filters: 55mm
Hood: built-in
Optics: 13 elements in 9 groups
Weight: 585g



Porst lenses   top

German Photo Porst offered a complete range of lenses for their rebranded CR camera line, including »Porst« labeled 50mm Fujinons as well as a group of lenses allegedly manufactured by the Japanese Ozone Optical. These included a 24/3.5 and 28/2.8 Macro, 135/2.8 and 200/3.5 tele lenses and a few zooms in the mid to tele range.






How to use X-Fujinon lenses on a SONY NEX or
Micro Four Thirds Camera
  top

Adaption of X-Fujinon lenses to mirrorless digital cameras is straightforward with a mechanical adapter like the one shown here. (If you cant find them, try searching »fujinon nex« on the ugly auction site.) Make sure to activate »Shoot without lens« (or similar) in settings as the adapter does not communicate with the camera. I recommend a bit of tape for tighter fit. Apply sparingly though as it will affect infity focus. A different method is described here (scroll down to »How to adjust your loose manual-focus lens adapter...«) The Kiwi adapter does not actuate the aperture lever on the lens which is needed for stop-down operation, but a simple o-ring will do.







Fujica AX-5   top
also known as PORST CR-7 multiprogram



Fujis top of the line X camera: An advanced, CPU-controlled SLR in an aluminum chassis, featuring auto-exposure and multi-program modes, yet without AF. The camera was reviewed in the September 1981 issue of German Stiftung Warentest and received the highest »very good« rating, on par with the Canon A1, Leica R4 and Minolta XD7. US Popular Photography called the AX-5 »clearly ahead of the offerings of several of the other majors« and rated it »Good« for both material choice and assembly. »The AX-5 has virtually state-of-the-art electronics and an impressive range of metering capabilities in a small, lightweight, solid-feeling package. Despite some of its shortcomings, there is a lot of firepower there. (...) it feels just plain good in the hands.« (Popular Photography, March 1981)

German Color Foto previewed the AX-5 and X system in the December issue of 1979 and predicted a »victory all along the line.« A full review followed in the 2/1980 issue. German Photo Revue had a three-page feature in the 1/80 issue titled »Pentathlon with Fuji«, emphasizing the advanced program modes and lineup of 14 X-Fujinon lenses.

The British Journal of Photography introduced the X system in November 1979. »Two final points are characteristic of the present manufacturing approach to this type of camera. First, the new Fujica series X models are compact cameras (...) within a millimetre or two the same size as the Olympus OM bodies. (...) Second, the cameras are built to compete with specific equivalents at various price levels. Thus the AX-5 should match the price of the Canon A-1.«

The black model was released later than chrome and featured a lock on the shutter-speed dial to keep it from being inadvertently moved.

Shutter: Electronically controlled, cloth type, 2 - 1/1000 sec and bulb
Operating modes: Aperture-priority, Shutterspeed-priority, Programmed (full auto), Flash, Manual
Viewfinder: LED aperture and shutter speed settings, exposure mode
Battery: 6V
Winder: Fujica Auto Winder X (up to 2 frames / sec)
List price: 600$ with X-Fujinon 55/1.6; for comparison, the Canon A1 with FD 50/1.8 was listed at 630$, the Nikon FE with Nikkor 50/1.8 at 584$ (Source: Kiplinger's Changing Times, 05/1980)
Street price: 340$ with X-Fujinon 50/1.6 EBC, 325$ with X-Fujinon 50/1.6, 270$ body only (Source: Photron ad, 06/1981)






Fujica AX-3   top
also known as PORST CR-5 computer



Almost identical to the AX-5, except for shutter speed priority operation. This was the single mode offered by Canons hugely successful AE-1 at the time. The finder displays a single LED speed scale, opposed to two scales for shutter speed and aperture in the AX-5. Selected aperture is reflected through to a window below the pentaprism instead.

French Chasseur d'Images featured the AX-3 in the April 1980 issue, followed by an extensive nine page user report in 1982. »Aesthetically the Fujica AX-3 is rather pleasant; controls are well laid out and the grip is good. Sophisticated but not complicated to use, the AX-3 is well suited for the demanding amateur. (...) We summarize the AX-3 in four words: simple, performing, efficient and intelligent. (...) in short, it is complete!« (Chasseur d'Images, April 1980) »An examination of the various couplings and diaphragm blades shows no abnormal wear: This test is a victory for the AX-3. (...) Bravo!« (Chasseur d'Images, »50.000 exposures with the AX-3«, July-August 1982)

Italian Fotografare rated the AX-3 »good but not great« and »on balance, positive». Main point of critique was the LED exposure readout. There were also four lenses included in the review. »Ultimately, our tests have shown that the (…) 28/3.5 and 200/4.5 may well be defined good, while the performance offered by the 55/1.6 EBC and 135/3.5 leaves much to be desired.» (Fotografare 6/1980)

Shutter: Electronically controlled, cloth type, 2 - 1/1000 sec and bulb
Operating modes: Aperture-priority, Flash, Manual
Viewfinder: LED shutter speed settings, aperture window
Battery: 6V
Winder: Fujica Auto Winder X (up to 2 frames / sec)
List price: 410$ with X-Fujinon 55/2.2; for comparison, the Canon AE-1 with FD 50/1.8 was listed at 451$, the Nikon EM with Nikkor 50/1.8 at 357$ (Source: Kiplinger's Changing Times, 05/1980)
Street price: 249$ with X-Fujinon 50/1.6 EBC, 214$ with X-Fujinon 55/2.2, 179$ body only (Source: Photron ad, 06/1981)



Fujica AX-1   top
also known as PORST CR-3 automatic



»The AX-1 felt well-balanced with either long or short lenses. The camera handled well in both vertical or horizontal positions, and proved to be a good little workhorse.« (Popular Photography, June 1982)

»The Fujica AX-1 has automatic shutter speed control with aperture priority only but no manual shutter speeds. This simplified version of the AX-3 has a four-position shutter switch surrounding the release button, and LED lights up opposite one of five pairs of shutter speeds (100/500, 250/125, 60/30, 15/8 and 4/2) on a scale at the left of the finder field.« (British Journal of Photography, November 1979)

Shutter: Electronically controlled, cloth type, 2 - 1/1000 sec and bulb, 1/60 sec manual speed
Operating modes: Aperture-priority, Flash
Viewfinder: LED shutter speed settings (less detailed than AX-3 and AX-5)
Battery: 6V
Winder: Fujica Auto Winder X (up to 2 frames / sec)
List price: 365$ with X-Fujinon 55/2.2 (Source: Kiplinger's Changing Times, 05/1980)
Street price: 215$ with X-Fujinon 50/1.6 EBC, 179$ with X-Fujinon 55/2.2, 145$ body only (Source: Photron ad, 06/1981)






Fujica STX-1   top
also known as PORST CR-1



Traditional mechanical SLR, intended to be the entry model for the X system. Two 1.5v batteries are required for the exposure meter only. Concept of operation is to set a desired speed first, then half-press the shutter button to get a meter reading and adjust aperture on the lens accordingly. »Aperture priority« works as well technically but will take more time switching from a half-press of the shutter to speed dial and back to the shutter again.

The updated STX-1n featured a very basic LED exposure meter (+ = -) and was otherwise identical.

The last Fuji STX-2 featured improved metering and a mechanical top speed of 1/1000 sec.

Shutter: Mechanical, cloth type, 1/2 - 1/700 sec and bulb
Operating modes: Manual
Viewfinder: Shutter speed scale, match needle exposure meter
Battery: 2 x 1.5V (SR44)
Winder: none
List price: -
Street price: 149$ with X-Fujinon 50/1.6, 130$ with X-Fujinon 55/2.2, 95$ body only (Source: Photron ad, 06/1981)






Fuji AX Multiprogram   top



Late auto-only, lightweight SLR featuring three program modes. Previewed in the November 1985 issue of US Popular Photography.

Shutter: Electronically controlled, cloth type, 2 - 1/1000 sec and bulb
Operating modes: Depth-of-field program (DP), Normal program (P), High-speed program (HP)
Viewfinder: LED Program indicator
Battery: 6V (4SR44)
Winder: Fujica Auto Winder X (up to 2 frames / sec)
List price: -
Street price: 130$ body only (Source: Cameraworld ad, 01/1988)